The Drought of Illness

“And it will be that you shall drink from the brook, and I have commanded the ravens to feed you there.”  1 Kings 17:4

After sustaining his brain injury, my son TJ was in and out of hospitals and rehab centers for 19 months before he finally came home.  Once I heard a doctor, in disbelief, remark about the great amount of time that TJ had spent in the hospital, which led me to believe that it was something they didn’t see very often.  The doctor then went on to state that they needed to get us home because we had spent way too much time there. But the truth was, even though it may sound strange to many people, the hospital really wasn’t all that bad.  In fact, when TJ’s discharge date at Mayo was approaching, I tried persuading the doctors with various reasons of why they needed to keep him longer. Of course, it didn’t work, but I thought it was worth a try.

The hospital provided for TJ medically of course, but the hospital also played another important role in our lives.  It was our social life. I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but at some point during our stay, the medical staff shifted from not only being his medical providers but to being our friends.  Even though we were cut off from the outside world, it didn’t matter because inside the hospital there were people everywhere at all hours of the day, and they understood better than anyone the journey we were on. And dare I say that during TJ’s healthier hospitalization times, he even had some fun. One of my fondest memories of him in the hospital was the way he broke in new nurses. Oftentimes they were young, and upon seeing their fresh, new face, a little smile would break out across his lips, and instantly I knew what was coming.  While the new nurse was being given his bedside report from the nurse whose shift was over, he would pretend he was going into respiratory failure and start thrashing around on his bed. Then when the new nurse became wide-eyed and nervous, he would finally stop his antics and begin laughing.

TJ hugging his physical therapist

In the hospital TJ was very well taken care of, and I was able to just be his mom.  We were surrounded by friendly, caring, supportive people, and help was just a call button push away. Why would we ever want to leave?  After being hospitalized for so long, the world beyond the hospital walls had become too scary to live in in our new-normal state.  I was content to just stay there.

But eventually TJ did come home…….and then we were isolated.  Gone were the days of the hustle and bustle of the hospital and the friendships we made there.  We sat at home by ourselves day after day because we learned after he came home that it was very difficult to go out into the community with a chronically ill person.  Packing everything beforehand was exhausting. Finding wide enough parking spaces for the wheelchair lift could be difficult. Equipment and wheelchairs sometimes malfunctioned and left us stranded.  Some stores were difficult to maneuver a wheelchair in like GameStop, my worst nightmare for many reasons. Friend’s and family’s homes were difficult or impossible to enter. Restroom use and the fear of accidents was always stressful.  Do we use the Men’s? Do we use the Women’s? And if I’m alone what do I do with him if I have to go? Suctioning the trach in the movie theater and annoying others during a movie caused anxiety. It was loud and sometimes needed to be done multiple times an hour. Yes, sometimes it was easier to just stay home where it was most comfortable. But staying home all the time also becomes depressing. We had little contact with other people. The darkness was growing in all around us, and we were feeling lonelier and lonelier.

We hadn’t been to church in months either.  He couldn’t sit through a service in his wheelchair without getting uncomfortable, and, of course, we were nervous about suctioning his trach.  Attending the youth group like he used to wasn’t an option anymore. We didn’t know where we fit in. We didn’t know where we belonged, so we just stayed home.  We were in a drought, and it seemed like it would never end.

But then one day I heard my doorbell ring.  I opened it to see a pretty, blonde-haired woman standing there with a bouquet of flowers in her hand.  She stated her name was Beth and she was from the Hand in Hand Ministry at Valley Church, so I invited her in. She said she had heard about us and wanted to share about Valley Church and the special needs ministry and invite us to attend.  She told me she would provide a buddy for TJ who would even suction his trach so we could attend church. I could feel the excitement welling up inside of me, and I was overjoyed.  I knew God had sent her. She was a raven sent by God to provide spiritual nourishment and a place to belong and be loved.

The prophet Elijah also knows what it’s like to live through a drought.  Let’s read in
1 Kings about his experience and how God provided for him.

1 Kings 17:1-7
“And Elijah the Tishbite, of the inhabitants of Gilead, said to Ahab, ‘As the Lord God of Israel lives, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, except at my word.’ Then the word of the Lord came to him, saying, ‘Get away from here and turn eastward, and hide by the Brook Cherith, which flows into the Jordan.  And it will be that you shall drink from the brook, and I have commanded the ravens to feed you there.’

“So he went and did according to the word of the Lord, for he went and stayed by the Brook Cherith, which flows into the Jordan.  The ravens brought him bread and meat in the morning, and bread and meat in the evening; and he drank from the brook. And it happened after a while that the brook dried up, because there had been no rain in the land.”

So let’s unpack this a little. Ahab was an evil king, and he did more to provoke the Lord than all the kings of Israel who were before him.  His government formally promoted and worshiped the false god Baal. It seemed as though the worship of the one true God would be eradicated throughout the land of the northern kingdom Israel.  But then Elijah came on the scene. Elijah was a man of God and told Ahab that there would be a drought in the land……And then it happened. Baal was thought to be the sky god, the god of the weather, and Elijah’s dramatic prediction flew in the face of Baal and proved that his God Yahweh was more powerful than Baal.  Elijah’s life was now in danger, so God told him to get away and hide by the Brook Cherith. And while he was staying by the Brook Cherith, the Lord sent the ravens to provide for him, until the time came when the drought dried up the brook and the Lord moved him on.

Sometimes in our life, there are times when we too are in a drought and are sent by God to hide by the brook and be alone with Him.  Droughts can come in various forms. The drought of illness. The drought of divorce. The drought of the death of a loved one. The drought of the child who is never born.  During the droughts of life, it can feel very lonely and few may understand what you are going through.  Oftentimes the Lord sends us to a place where we can escape the drought and where He can show His loving kindness to us by providing for us and hiding us from the bustling activity of society that constantly attempts to drown out His voice.  Although it may not feel like it, the lonely brook He sends us to is a place of safety. It is by the peaceful brook where we quiet our hearts and focus on the Lord and where He becomes our only friend.

During the quiet times when we are hiding by the brook, our focus should be on looking for the ways in which God is providing for us.  Just as He sent ravens to Elijah in a miraculous way to feed him with meat and bread, we can be sure that He is providing for us in miraculous ways as well.

The word “Cherith” in the ancient Hebrew root means to “cut away, to cut up or off.” God could have sent Elijah anywhere He chose, but He chose the Brook Cherith for a reason. During our time when the Lord sends us to reside by the brook, not only is He showing His tender loving mercy toward us and providing for us, but He is also cutting away the sin in our life so He can use us in even greater ways.  He loves us too much to leave us in our current state. Maybe He’s cutting away a dependence on people instead of Him. Or maybe He’s cutting away a stronghold in your life that you just can’t get free from. Maybe He’s cutting away laziness that is causing a staleness in your spiritual life. Whatever it is that He is at work doing, we can rest assured that one day when His cutting away time is accomplished, He will move us on.

Just as the Lord provided manna for the children of Israel in the wilderness, meat and bread from the ravens for Elijah, and multiplied loaves of bread and fish for the hungry, He will provide for you while you are in your drought.  God cares about His people and will provide for them. You need only to be still and obey and rest in His presence.

2 thoughts on “The Drought of Illness

  1. So much truth here and so much I could relate to. I was grateful when I went from being the sole, full-time caregiver to a husband with dementia to when I became his wife again as he moved to assisted living. And I’ve often thought, during very lonely times, that God is teaching me that He is all sufficient. Thanks for sharing your wisdom!

    Liked by 2 people

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